The influence of early eating habits in children

Our little one, who is now 10 months old, seems to have got his eating sorted after a stubborn start. We started weaning around the World Health Organization’s recommended 6-month mark, using a mix of spoon feeding and baby-led weaning (more on that in later post). Since then, it has seemed apparent that some things have gone down better than others: scrambled eggs, yoghurt, cheese, toast, chicken, bananas and strawberries were all early hits, while broccoli, tomatoes and beef were swiftly rejected.

He seems to have developed an appetite for some foods after a unsure start, such as cucumber, carrot and apple. And this brought to mind a Naked Scientists podcast from a few months ago, which featured an interview with Marion Hetherington, Professor of Biopsychology at the University of Leeds, on children’s appetite and eating behaviour.

The full transcript is available here and the audio is available here. I’ve made a few summary points below, but do check out the full interview.

  • A developing foetus can encounter tastes and odours derived from the mother’s diet and toxins from the environment, and this may affect later food preference.
  • Babies fed with breast milk are exposed to a greater variety of flavours than are formula-fed babies, and this can mean they are more willing to try new tastes.
  • Babies are primed to accept sweet tastes from birth, whereas bitter tastes are rejected. This means that we have to learn to like bitter foods but not sugary foods.
  • Parents may need to try their baby 8-10 times with a new flavour before the child will accept it, so parents shouldn’t give up after the usual 2-3 times. Also, there may be a sensitive period between 6-9 months in which to introduce new flavours and textures, after which it becomes harder for the child to accept a new food.
  • If a child of school age is fussy about trying new foods, then using rewards and social praise is an effective way of persuading them to test new tastes.
  • Setting healthy eating preferences early on is best to keep healthy eating going into childhood. Even if eating habits go awry in teenage years, many return to their early healthy eating habits as adults.

I thought this raised some interesting points, such as the persistance needed to introduce new tastes during a sensitive time window, and was worth highlighting.

It’d be interesting to know how these environmental factors interact with genetically influenced preferences, such as whether early exposure to broccoli, sprouts or cabbage can moderate the repulsion certain people have towards a compound in those foods. It has been suggested that ageing, smoking or illness may modify this genetically based food preference, and so it would be intriguing to know whether child eating behaviour did so too.

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